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Labour Party resolution pushes to recall Kashmir resolution, upsets Indian community 

Members and splinter groups within Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour Party have launched an agenda to “recall” a resolution on Jammu and Kashmir. The move was launched at it annual conference last week, and became an instant fail with the Indian community. The resolution also provoked a near-boycott of the party and its MPs.

Reiterating the party’s longstanding human rights focused position on Jammu and Kashmir, was called “uninformed and unfounded” by New Delhi. Senior Labour MP of Indian origin, Keith Vaz said the resolution “has been misguided and unhelpful”, adding that it was “agreed without the approval of the National Executive Committee of the Labour Party or the leader of the party, Jeremy Corbyn. It has created unnecessary distress and division within the party and the country.”

Another senior Labour MP Virendra Sharma said the process by which the resolution was passed needs to be looked into by the NEC. A prominent pro-India voice in British politics, Sharma is one of the several Labour leaders facing a backlash from the Indian community for the party stand on Jammu and Kashmir.

In a statement, Vaz said, “People have strongly-held views on Kashmir. Although many have settled in the UK, they have friends, family and emotional links to the region. It would be wrong to allow this matter to distract from the amazing relationships they share in the towns and cities in Britain.” He added, “I have therefore written to the chair of the NEC, Andi Fox, and to Corbyn, asking them to recall the motion and hold a proper debate at the NEC to adopt a common party position that does not divide our communities.”

In a column published in a leading British Asian publication, London mayor Sadiq Khan said he is “deeply upset” in an article.

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